2016 Goals – Consider this before setting any goals

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2016 Pre-Goal Consideration Idea: I thought of this last year and it worked for me, so I feel safe sharing it with you.

Before you write down any goals take some time to be still and think about your overall “LIFE INTENT and PURPOSE.” By doing this you :

1. Become very clear about the engagements, movement, activities and conversations you will participate in and identify those which align to your Intent and Purpose (great way to say “yes” or “no” to opportunities or obstacles)

2. Won’t rush to write your goals (this is not a race and you are not in competition). Sit with your intent and purpose until it feels real to you. This may mean writing goals in February, be kind to yourself and know that’s OK.

3. Identify your three words. Write down three words that epitomize who you need to be, characteristics warranted, or actions you feel support your Intent and Purpose. You may write down 30 words at first, but take all the time you need to identify the top three.

My three words are: BOLD, FOCUSED, and PRESENT.

4. Write down your Intent and Purpose and three words. Keep these in front of you as you write your goals. You will find that it will be much easier to write goals that are aligned with your statement and eliminate goals that may be things you feel obligated to do but aren’t truly in your heart, and simply look good on paper.

5. Throughout the year, life will happen and your goals may change. If you keep your Intent and Purpose in front of you, you will find it easy to consciously adjust your goals. Although life changes, the essence of who you are (your intent and purpose pretty much remains a constant).

My intent and purpose is to motivate, empower, inspire, educate, mobilize, and give back, so I truly hope this helps someone to take the angst out of goal planning and to empower you to make this process your own personal journey.

Wishing you all a great New Year! I’m SO very excited about the amazing things that are waiting me in 2016 Looking forward to sharing the journey! #noexcuses

Weekend Website Warrior: Build a Website using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS – September Cohort

“Weekend Website Warrior” Experience

Build a Website using Java Script, HTML, and CSS in a Weekend

Day 1: Saturday, September 12, 2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Day 2: Saturday, September 19,  2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

**Must attend both days**

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

During this project based class you will learn to code interactive websites using JavaScript, HTML and CSS.  Whether you are looking to re-career into the field of technology, become a front-end developer, design a personal or business website, start a business, or simply try something new, this class is for you.

At the end of the weekend you will:

  • Have a working knowledge of basic JavaScript, HTML, and CSS
  • Understand the components to build an interactive website
  • Have a basic knowledge of universal programming concepts such as loops, variables,    and functions
  • Know how to write simple JavaScript Plug-ins
  • Build an interactive website
  • Understand the components of client meetings and the data collection process
  • Leave with tools and references to expand your learning after class
  • Gain a new skill you can use immediately
  • Leave EMPOWERED understanding that you can learn something new and potentially re-career into the field of technology.

What you need to bring:

Eliminating all stress and barriers all you need to bring is YOURSELF, a willingness to learn and a smile!  We provide all hardware/computers and software, so there is no need to bring your laptop or miss this opportunity to learn if you don’t have one.  We also provide lunch and snacks each day along with online and manual learning materials for your personal use during and after class.

Prerequisites

During this program you will learn the skills needed to become a front-end developer, however you DO NOT need to have previous coding experience.  Participants should be comfortable using computer applications like Microsoft Windows, Internet, and Email.

After Class Resources (included in the cost of the program)

Our weekend website program is not just a “one hit wonder,” we pride ourselves with providing you with the tools you need to become a coder and provide after class resources including:

  • Updates on technology career opportunities
  • Invitation to professional technology networking opportunities
  •  Access to a community of women with similar goals and experiences

Refund Policy

We do not offer cash refunds, however you can use your payment towards another Sisters Code Class.

In an effort to provide the optimal learning environment seating is limited.

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

Weekend Website Warrior: Build a Website with JavaScript, HTML, and CSS – May Cohort

“Weekend Website Warrior” Experience

Build a Website using Java Script, HTML, and CSS in a Weekend

Day 1: Saturday, May 30, 2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Day 2: Saturday, June 6 2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

**Must attend both days**

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

During this project based class you will learn to code interactive websites using JavaScript, HTML and CSS.  Whether you are looking to re-career into the field of technology, become a front-end developer, design a personal or business website, start a business, or simply try something new, this class is for you.

At the end of the weekend you will:

  • Have a working knowledge of basic JavaScript, HTML, and CSS
  • Understand the components to build an interactive website
  • Have a basic knowledge of universal programming concepts such as loops, variables,    and functions
  • Know how to write simple JavaScript Plug-ins
  • Build an interactive website
  • Understand the components of client meetings and the data collection process
  • Leave with tools and references to expand your learning after class
  • Gain a new skill you can use immediately
  • Leave EMPOWERED understanding that you can learn something new and potentially re-career into the field of technology.

What you need to bring:

Eliminating all stress and barriers all you need to bring is YOURSELF, a willingness to learn and a smile!  We provide all hardware/computers and software, so there is no need to bring your laptop or miss this opportunity to learn if you don’t have one.  We also provide lunch and snacks each day along with online and manual learning materials for your personal use during and after class.

Prerequisites

During this program you will learn the skills needed to become a front-end developer, however you DO NOT need to have previous coding experience.  Participants should be comfortable using computer applications like Microsoft Windows, Internet, and Email.

After Class Resources (included in the cost of the program)

Our weekend website program is not just a “one hit wonder,” we pride ourselves with providing you with the tools you need to become a coder and provide after class resources including:

  • Updates on technology career opportunities
  • Invitation to professional technology networking opportunities
  •  Access to a community of women with similar goals and experiences

Refund Policy

We do not offer cash refunds, however you can use your payment towards another Sisters Code Class.

In an effort to provide the optimal learning environment seating is limited.

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

Sisters Code collaborates with the Ford STEAM Lab and #YesWeCode to Bring Silicon Valley to Detroit

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  • Ford STEAM Lab, a Ford Motor Company Fund program, to host a hackathon for 100 middle school students to learn software coding skills, develop solutions to education reform
  • Ford is collaborating with California-based #YesWeCode and Level Playing Field Institute, and two Detroit organizations, Sisters Code and Grand Circus, a tech training company
  • Event features a high profile panel of judges including Stephen Henderson/Detroit Free Press; Van Jones/#YesWeCode; and Skype appearance by Detroit native and rapper Big Sean
  • The hackathon will be held March 27-28 at the Ford Resource and Engagement Center in Detroit. MSNBC will broadcast live from the hackathon on Friday, March 27

DETROIT, March 11, 2015 –Ford STEAM Lab, an educational program from the Ford Motor Company Fund, is bringing the power of Silicon Valley to Detroit with an innovative two-day hackathon to help middle school students improve their education while exploring high-tech careers.

The 100 students from five Detroit-area middle schools will learn the basics of software coding as they create and “hack” an application that will help them learn better. Their projects will be judged by a high profile panel of judges as they compete for bragging rights and more than $30,000 in scholarships and awards.

“Student voice and authentic inclusion is important to students succeeding in education,” said Shawn Wilson, manager, Multicultural Community Engagement, Ford Motor Company Fund.

“Ford’s goal is to not only empower students to take control of their educational future, but also discover a potential career pathway in Michigan’s growing technology sector.”

Ford STEAM Lab is collaborating with:

  •  #YesWeCode, an Oakland, Calif.-based organization that targets low-opportunity youth and provides them with the necessary resources and tools to become world-class computer programmers.
  • Level Playing Field Institute, an educational organization based in Oakland, Calif., committed to eliminating the barriers faced by underrepresented people of color in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM).
  • Sisters Code, a Detroit organization dedicated to helping women succeed in STEM-related fields.
  • Grand Circus, a company based in Detroit that provides training and other skills necessary to work in technology companies.
  • National Dropout Prevention Center/Network, a national organization that works on strategies to increase the graduation rate in America’s schools.

“In the new century, technology is central to middle class jobs and income. We are proud to work with partners like Ford and the Level Playing Field Institute, to support 21st Century opportunities to students in Detroit,” said Van Jones, #YesWeCode founder.

The hackathon will be held March 27-28 at the Ford Resource and Engagement Center at 2826 Bagley St., Detroit, 48216.

MSNBC will broadcast live from the hackathon on Friday, March 27. More details on the program will be announced at a later date.

After learning coding skills on the first day, students will present their app ideas to a panel of judges on the second day. The panel will include Stephen Henderson, Pulitzer Prize-winning Editorial Page Editor of the Detroit Free Press and co-host of Detroit Today on WDET; and Van Jones, #YesWeCode founder, and environmental and civil rights advocate.

At the conclusion of the event, students will hear via Skype about two very different success stories. Detroit native and singer/songwriter Big Sean will speak to the importance of technology in music and how it changed the music industry.

Ford STEAM Lab was launched in October 2014 to spark high potential, low opportunity student passion for technology entrepreneurship and careers in traditional STEM fields, as well as automotive design and vehicle technology. STEAM Lab adds an arts component to help students learn how to use creativity and innovation in problem solving and collaboration.  

Ford Motor Company Fund invests more than $8 million a year in scholarships and other education initiatives. In addition to the Ford STEAM Lab, Ford Fund educational programs include Ford Blue Oval Scholars, Ford Next Generation Learning, Ford College Community Challenge and Ford Driving Dreams Tour. 

Gender Diversity in Technology: Why “Awakening the Mature Geek” and targeting women to re-career into the field of technology is essential

Sister Coder "Aha Moment." The moment the code you wrote actually works!

Sister Coder “Aha Moment.” The moment the code you wrote actually works!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lack of females in the technology industry is the new “hot topic,” but it’s an old issue. As an African American Female in technology, I appreciate the discussion around this issue, however it’s going to take much more than fancy charts, statistics, or one off speeches from the token women in a technology  company to positively shift the technology gender and racial  diversity gap.

Bridging the technology gender gap is definitely possible, however it’s the “action” not the words that will get us there.  The key to bridging that gap is to stop ignoring grown women with the aptitude to code and empower them to re-career into the field of technology.

I am living proof that by “Awakening the Mature Geek,” we can make a major impact on gender gap in the field of technology.  At the age of 25, I was an aspiring mortician until a corporation hired me as a full-time paid employee and  afforded me the opportunity to learn to code in seven different languages in a 13-week program.  I emerged as a Mainframe (yes I’m dating myself) and the rest is history.  Technology literally transformed my life, the life of my family, and positively impacted my community.

The picture in this blog shows one of  Detroit’s based Sisters Code Participants experiencing a “coding ah-ha” moment.  I remember my light bulb moment like it was yesterday.  I wrote code in JCL and COBOL and fell in love with the possibility of learning more.  After learning DB2, CICS, IMS…I felt as if I could change the world.  Bottom-line:  I was enticed to try something different and I was exposed to a new career.

We are missing the mark:  There are lots of programs centered on motivating girls to consider S.T.E.M. field, coding classes not tied to workforce development, the lame excuse of “fitting into the culture,” and I totally disagree with Rev. Jesse Jackson that this is a Civil Rights Issue.  Unfortunately we are missing an entire population of women who have already entered the workforce, can start work tomorrow, bring a different level of expertise, work ethic, and overall a different flavor to the office.

Recently 10 companies released their diversity stats and although the numbers are staggering, I’m confident we can bridge the technology gender gap.  I’ve provided numbers based on overall female employees, female employees in tech jobs, and % of African Americans employed at the company.

  1. Google: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  2. Apple: Females makeup 30% of the workforce is women, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  3. Facebook: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  4. Twitter: Females makeup 20% of the workforce , however 10% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  5. Yahoo: Females makeup 37% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  6. LinkedIn: Females makeup 39% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  7. Pandora: Females makeup 49.2% of the workforce, however 18% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  8. Ebay: Females makeup 42% of the workforce, however 24% hold tech jobs.  7% of employees are African American.
  9. Pinterest: Females makeup 66% of the workforce, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  10. HP:  Females makeup 32.5% of the workforce. 6.06% are African American.

As a thought leader on empowering women to re-career into the field of technology, I’m willing to do my part.  If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

he lack of females in the technology industry is the new “hot topic,” but it’s an old issue. As an African American Female in technology, I appreciate the discussion around this issue, however it’s going to take much more than fancy charts, statistics, or one off speeches from the token women in a technology  company to positively shift the technology gender and racial  diversity gap.

Bridging the technology gender gap is definitely possible, however it’s the “action” not the words that will get us there.  The key to bridging that gap is to stop ignoring grown women with the aptitude to code and empower them to re-career into the field of technology.

I am living proof that by “Awakening the Mature Geek,” we can make a major impact on gender gap in the field of technology.  At the age of 25, I was an aspiring mortician until a corporation hired me as a full-time paid employee and  afforded me the opportunity to learn to code in seven different languages in a 13-week program.  I emerged as a Mainframe (yes I’m dating myself) and the rest is history.  Technology literally transformed my life, the life of my family, and positively impacted my community.

The picture in this blog shows one of  Detroit’s based Sisters Code Participants experiencing a “coding ah-ha” moment.  I remember my light bulb moment like it was yesterday.  I wrote code in JCL and COBOL and fell in love with the possibility of learning more.  After learning DB2, CICS, IMS…I felt as if I could change the world.  Bottom-line:  I was enticed to try something different and I was exposed to a new career.

We are missing the mark:  There are lots of programs centered on motivating girls to consider S.T.E.M. field, coding classes not tied to workforce development, the lame excuse of “fitting into the culture,” and I totally disagree with Rev. Jesse Jackson that this is a Civil Rights Issue.  Unfortunately we are missing an entire population of women who have already entered the workforce, can start work tomorrow, bring a different level of expertise, work ethic, and overall a different flavor to the office.

Recently 10 companies released their diversity stats and although the numbers are staggering, I’m confident we can bridge the technology gender gap.  I’ve provided numbers based on overall female employees, female employees in tech jobs, and % of African Americans employed at the company.

  1. Google: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  2. Apple: Females makeup 30% of the workforce is women, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  3. Facebook: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  4. Twitter: Females makeup 20% of the workforce , however 10% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  5. Yahoo: Females makeup 37% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  6. LinkedIn: Females makeup 39% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  7. Pandora: Females makeup 49.2% of the workforce, however 18% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  8. Ebay: Females makeup 42% of the workforce, however 24% hold tech jobs.  7% of employees are African American.
  9. Pinterest: Females makeup 66% of the workforce, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  10. HP:  Females makeup 32.5% of the workforce. 6.06% are African American.

As a thought leader on empowering women to re-career into the field of technology, I’m willing to do my part.  If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

- See more at: http://www.marlinpage.com/2014/gender-diversity-in-technology-why-awakening-the-mature-geek-and-targeting-older-women-to-re-career-into-the-field-of-tech-is-essential/#sthash.0hcrB0hQ.dpuf

he lack of females in the technology industry is the new “hot topic,” but it’s an old issue. As an African American Female in technology, I appreciate the discussion around this issue, however it’s going to take much more than fancy charts, statistics, or one off speeches from the token women in a technology  company to positively shift the technology gender and racial  diversity gap.

Bridging the technology gender gap is definitely possible, however it’s the “action” not the words that will get us there.  The key to bridging that gap is to stop ignoring grown women with the aptitude to code and empower them to re-career into the field of technology.

I am living proof that by “Awakening the Mature Geek,” we can make a major impact on gender gap in the field of technology.  At the age of 25, I was an aspiring mortician until a corporation hired me as a full-time paid employee and  afforded me the opportunity to learn to code in seven different languages in a 13-week program.  I emerged as a Mainframe (yes I’m dating myself) and the rest is history.  Technology literally transformed my life, the life of my family, and positively impacted my community.

The picture in this blog shows one of  Detroit’s based Sisters Code Participants experiencing a “coding ah-ha” moment.  I remember my light bulb moment like it was yesterday.  I wrote code in JCL and COBOL and fell in love with the possibility of learning more.  After learning DB2, CICS, IMS…I felt as if I could change the world.  Bottom-line:  I was enticed to try something different and I was exposed to a new career.

We are missing the mark:  There are lots of programs centered on motivating girls to consider S.T.E.M. field, coding classes not tied to workforce development, the lame excuse of “fitting into the culture,” and I totally disagree with Rev. Jesse Jackson that this is a Civil Rights Issue.  Unfortunately we are missing an entire population of women who have already entered the workforce, can start work tomorrow, bring a different level of expertise, work ethic, and overall a different flavor to the office.

Recently 10 companies released their diversity stats and although the numbers are staggering, I’m confident we can bridge the technology gender gap.  I’ve provided numbers based on overall female employees, female employees in tech jobs, and % of African Americans employed at the company.

  1. Google: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  2. Apple: Females makeup 30% of the workforce is women, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  3. Facebook: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  4. Twitter: Females makeup 20% of the workforce , however 10% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  5. Yahoo: Females makeup 37% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  6. LinkedIn: Females makeup 39% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  7. Pandora: Females makeup 49.2% of the workforce, however 18% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  8. Ebay: Females makeup 42% of the workforce, however 24% hold tech jobs.  7% of employees are African American.
  9. Pinterest: Females makeup 66% of the workforce, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  10. HP:  Females makeup 32.5% of the workforce. 6.06% are African American.

As a thought leader on empowering women to re-career into the field of technology, I’m willing to do my part.  If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

- See more at: http://www.marlinpage.com/2014/gender-diversity-in-technology-why-awakening-the-mature-geek-and-targeting-older-women-to-re-career-into-the-field-of-tech-is-essential/#sthash.0hcrB0hQ.dpuf

Lady Paragons Interview – My journey in technology and how we empower women to re-career into the field of technology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had an amazing conversation with Sarah Worsham of Lady Paragons during the Women in STEM Podcast.  We talked about my journey from mortuary science to techie, the importance of awakening the mature geek and empowering women to re-career into technology, the Sisters Code difference, bridging the technology gender gap, the importance of walking in the room and “owning it,” and so much more.

Lady Paragons believe that women and girls can and do excel in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). They are building a community to tell the stories of women in STEM, showcase Women’s STEM organizations, and provide a platform where ladies can help ladies succeed in STEM careers. Click here for more information on Lady Paragons.

Below you will find the link to the podcast.  Check it out…would love your comments.!

http://bit.ly/1q51CVP

Sister Code Weekend Website Warrior Graduates to Shadow Developers at Detroit Based Chalkfly

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Two Sister Code Weekend Website Warrior Graduates will have an opportunity to take their new coding skills and shadow some of the best developers in the City of Detroit.  Chalkfly is an organization that is really working tirelessly to make a positive impact in the community.

As we move towards bridging the technology gender gap, it is very important for women to “see people” who are actually working in the field, and Chalkfly has stepped up to give our participants that opportunity.   “Sisters Code is larger than a class, and we will not be a “one hit wonder.”  This is a movement to bridge the technology gender gap, therefore we cannot just teach a class and not offer support for further career growth.   Asking corporations to offer opportunities like this doesn’t cost anything, however a shadowing or mentoring experience could potentially transform the life of a woman. I would say that the “ask” is worth it,” states Sisters Code Founder, Marlin Page.

Chalkfly’s entire business culture is stemmed in giving back and uplifting the community.  When you purchase an item from their online office supply store a portion of your purchase goes DIRECTLY to a teacher of your choice.  We all know that teachers are always looking for ways to enhance our children’s learning experience, and Chalkfly’s effort helps get them closer to that goal.

Click here for more information on Chalkfly.

Sisters Code Business Spotlight – Automation Alley

Social Enterprise Sisters Code Empowers Detroit Women, Transforms Lives Through Technology

We are living in a digital age that is increasingly defined by computer programs that require coding. Most of us have conquered how to work, play, socialize and consume information on apps, but very few of us understand the technology that makes them work. And when that discussion shifts to women, the number is even more alarming. Women make up 46.7 percent of the U.S. workforce, but they represent less than 25 percent of STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) workers, according to Detroit-based Sisters Code. The founder of this new social enterprise, Marlin Page, is determined to change that statistic.Launched in August, Sisters Code is on a mission to educate, empower and entice women – of all ages and ethnic backgrounds – to explore the world of coding and technology. The Sisters Code vision is to not only get women interested in learning to code, but to ultimately help them land jobs in technology fields.

“It is undeniable that jobs in the technology industry are not going anywhere. No matter the career you choose, you will touch a piece of technology. In every area of our lives, technology is here, and I believe it is very important for people to learn how to code,” said Page, who, in addition to being the brains behind the Sisters Code movement, also travels the country as a STEM speaker and strategist.

During her speaking engagements, Page found that her message was not reaching an important segment of the population: mature women. “I actually started off my professional career as an aspiring mortician and also a middle school substitute teacher in Detroit,” she said. “I thought, what if someone never offered me that opportunity? Then I wouldn’t have this awesome career I have today.”

Page said she knows how it feels to be underrepresented in the world of technology and coding. She made the decision at 25 during her summer break from teaching to learn to code. “It was a hard reality when I started coding. There were women in my class, but by the end, there weren’t many left. The numbers were even more glaring when I entered the executive level of my career,” she said.

Click here for full story

Million Women Mentors Launches National Movement to Mobilize One Million Mentors of Girls & Young Women in STEM Education and Careers

Photo courtesy of STEMConnector

Photo courtesy of STEMConnector

Million Women Mentors (MWM) was launched on January 8, 2014 in an effort to engage one million science, technology, engineering, and math  (STEM) mentors.  The initiative’s goal is to empower females to actively pursue STEM education and careers.   MWM has 13 corporate sponsors and more thatn 40 organizations dedicated to mentoring and increasing access to professionals working in the STEM field.

MWM’s launch includes the debut of the website www.millionwomenmentors.org, which will be developed in phases. The first phase will include a national call to action for those interested in mentoring.  The second and third phase will pair mentors and mentees in STEM Fields.

“We have the responsibility as a country to move the needle on girls and young women in STEM careers from 24 percent of our current workforce to 50 percent,” said Edie Fraser, CEO of STEMconnector and Co-Founder of Million Women Mentors.

“STEM careers offer women and girls the opportunity to engage in some of the most exciting realms of innovation. TCS believes we collectively need an all hands on deck approach, clearing hurdles as women navigate careers in STEM, and paving the way towards realizing greater equality and economic success,” said Surya Kant, Tata Consultancy Services’ President for North America, UK & Europe. “We are proud to be a Founding Partner of MWM and pledge our commitment to make mentoring accessible to girls and women across the nation, especially those from underrepresented minorities.”

Founding Sponsors include: Accenture, Cisco, Sodexo, Tata Consultancy Services (TCS) in addition to Diana Davis Spencer Foundation, Microsoft Research, Walmart and ADP. Silver sponsors include: Adecco Group North America, General Motors, Intellectual Ventures and UST Global.

Sisters Code Perspective:  When I entered the field of technology, I didn’t have a formal mentor and unfortunately there were not many females at the technology table.  Luckily, I found a mentor and he taught me the value of learning to code and helped me to navigate through a field filled with men.  I believe that a formal mentoring program and allowing young girls the ability to see “someone who looks like them,” in the tech field will  definitely help to bridge the gender gap in technology.   Sisters Code has joined the movement pledging to mentor help females looking to re-career into the field of technology!  We are looking forward to joining the movement!

Question:  Do you think mentoring will help empower girls in STEM?

Click Here to Find out more about MWM