Weekend Website Warrior: Build a Website using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS – December Cohort

“Weekend Website Warrior” Experience

Build a Website using Java Script, HTML, and CSS in a Weekend

Day 1: Saturday, December 5,  2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Day 2: Saturday, December 12,  2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

**Must attend both days**

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

During this project based class you will learn to code interactive websites using JavaScript, HTML and CSS.  Whether you are looking to re-career into the field of technology, become a front-end developer, design a personal or business website, start a business, or simply try something new, this class is for you.

At the end of the weekend you will:

  • Have a working knowledge of basic JavaScript, HTML, and CSS
  • Understand the components to build an interactive website
  • Have a basic knowledge of universal programming concepts such as loops, variables,    and functions
  • Know how to write simple JavaScript Plug-ins
  • Build an interactive website
  • Understand the components of client meetings and the data collection process
  • Leave with tools and references to expand your learning after class
  • Gain a new skill you can use immediately
  • Leave EMPOWERED understanding that you can learn something new and potentially re-career into the field of technology.

What you need to bring:

Eliminating all stress and barriers all you need to bring is YOURSELF, a willingness to learn and a smile!  We provide all hardware/computers and software, so there is no need to bring your laptop or miss this opportunity to learn if you don’t have one.  We also provide lunch and snacks each day along with online and manual learning materials for your personal use during and after class.

Prerequisites

During this program you will learn the skills needed to become a front-end developer, however you DO NOT need to have previous coding experience.  Participants should be comfortable using computer applications like Microsoft Windows, Internet, and Email.

After Class Resources (included in the cost of the program)

Our weekend website program is not just a “one hit wonder,” we pride ourselves with providing you with the tools you need to become a coder and provide after class resources including:

  • Updates on technology career opportunities
  • Invitation to professional technology networking opportunities
  •  Access to a community of women with similar goals and experiences

Refund Policy

We do not offer cash refunds, however you can use your payment towards another Sisters Code Class.

In an effort to provide the optimal learning environment seating is limited.

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

Weekend Website Warrior: Build a Website using JavaScript, HTML, and CSS – September Cohort

“Weekend Website Warrior” Experience

Build a Website using Java Script, HTML, and CSS in a Weekend

Day 1: Saturday, September 12, 2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Day 2: Saturday, September 19,  2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

**Must attend both days**

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

During this project based class you will learn to code interactive websites using JavaScript, HTML and CSS.  Whether you are looking to re-career into the field of technology, become a front-end developer, design a personal or business website, start a business, or simply try something new, this class is for you.

At the end of the weekend you will:

  • Have a working knowledge of basic JavaScript, HTML, and CSS
  • Understand the components to build an interactive website
  • Have a basic knowledge of universal programming concepts such as loops, variables,    and functions
  • Know how to write simple JavaScript Plug-ins
  • Build an interactive website
  • Understand the components of client meetings and the data collection process
  • Leave with tools and references to expand your learning after class
  • Gain a new skill you can use immediately
  • Leave EMPOWERED understanding that you can learn something new and potentially re-career into the field of technology.

What you need to bring:

Eliminating all stress and barriers all you need to bring is YOURSELF, a willingness to learn and a smile!  We provide all hardware/computers and software, so there is no need to bring your laptop or miss this opportunity to learn if you don’t have one.  We also provide lunch and snacks each day along with online and manual learning materials for your personal use during and after class.

Prerequisites

During this program you will learn the skills needed to become a front-end developer, however you DO NOT need to have previous coding experience.  Participants should be comfortable using computer applications like Microsoft Windows, Internet, and Email.

After Class Resources (included in the cost of the program)

Our weekend website program is not just a “one hit wonder,” we pride ourselves with providing you with the tools you need to become a coder and provide after class resources including:

  • Updates on technology career opportunities
  • Invitation to professional technology networking opportunities
  •  Access to a community of women with similar goals and experiences

Refund Policy

We do not offer cash refunds, however you can use your payment towards another Sisters Code Class.

In an effort to provide the optimal learning environment seating is limited.

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

Weekend Website Warrior: Build a Website with JavaScript, HTML, and CSS – May Cohort

“Weekend Website Warrior” Experience

Build a Website using Java Script, HTML, and CSS in a Weekend

Day 1: Saturday, May 30, 2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

Day 2: Saturday, June 6 2015 – 8:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.

**Must attend both days**

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

During this project based class you will learn to code interactive websites using JavaScript, HTML and CSS.  Whether you are looking to re-career into the field of technology, become a front-end developer, design a personal or business website, start a business, or simply try something new, this class is for you.

At the end of the weekend you will:

  • Have a working knowledge of basic JavaScript, HTML, and CSS
  • Understand the components to build an interactive website
  • Have a basic knowledge of universal programming concepts such as loops, variables,    and functions
  • Know how to write simple JavaScript Plug-ins
  • Build an interactive website
  • Understand the components of client meetings and the data collection process
  • Leave with tools and references to expand your learning after class
  • Gain a new skill you can use immediately
  • Leave EMPOWERED understanding that you can learn something new and potentially re-career into the field of technology.

What you need to bring:

Eliminating all stress and barriers all you need to bring is YOURSELF, a willingness to learn and a smile!  We provide all hardware/computers and software, so there is no need to bring your laptop or miss this opportunity to learn if you don’t have one.  We also provide lunch and snacks each day along with online and manual learning materials for your personal use during and after class.

Prerequisites

During this program you will learn the skills needed to become a front-end developer, however you DO NOT need to have previous coding experience.  Participants should be comfortable using computer applications like Microsoft Windows, Internet, and Email.

After Class Resources (included in the cost of the program)

Our weekend website program is not just a “one hit wonder,” we pride ourselves with providing you with the tools you need to become a coder and provide after class resources including:

  • Updates on technology career opportunities
  • Invitation to professional technology networking opportunities
  •  Access to a community of women with similar goals and experiences

Refund Policy

We do not offer cash refunds, however you can use your payment towards another Sisters Code Class.

In an effort to provide the optimal learning environment seating is limited.

CLICK THIS LINK TO REGISTER

Great resume, but YOU don’t fit our corporate culture – Bridging the gender and racial gap in technology

 

 

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During my many conversations on bridging the gender and racial gap in technology, a re-occurring theme is, “Hey, I want to hire a diverse workforce, but we have a hard time finding people who fit into our corporate culture.

OK… I’m going to stop you right there and ask, “What you talking about Willis? (You would only get this if you watched the TV Show Different Strokes, and yes I think I’m pretty funny.)  More times than not, my question is met with a blank face, a stumble in words, or a look of embarrassment.  My solution:  Don’t get uptight, don’t become defensive, I come in peace…Let’s talk about it.

Often time the corporate executives I consult with aren’t consciously excluding people,   however the ” culture fit” statement and reaction to my question, suggest an unconscious bias.  That statement is a covert way of saying,:  “Uh, you don’t look or act like anyone who works here, or for that matter anyone in my circle.  So, you may be qualified, but it’s not gonna work here.”

Openly and strategically discussing the “they don’t fit into the culture” statement, has actually lead to great conversations, challenging beliefs, uncovering fear, and hiring great people who help propel the organization to new heights with a wealth of diverse thoughts, talents, and creativity.

When you speak about fitting into the culture do you mean: The candidate is certain race or gender, they’re too old,  have a percieved socio-economic status, don’t look”cool” enough, can’t speak the jargon, don’t like sports, will be the “only” at the company picnic, and the reasoning goes on.

I know the reasons listed may seem a little outlandish, but speaking from experience some of the conversations, I’ve had around corporate culture have been over the top.  I worked at a corporation where my peer, an executive pointed and said, “We treat colored people equally.”  Now, you can’t tell me that he did not have a wild definition of what a cultural fit would be and I’m grateful he didn’t have a decision on hiring me as I would still be embalming people (long story…)

I’m not implying that company culture and values aren’t important, but I’m asking you to pause and ask yourself are you using it as an “excuse” to exclude amazing candidates from the field of technology.

Bottom-line:  I’m suggesting you call a meeting with yourself and then your staff to talk about “this culture fit”…what does it REALLY mean?  Next time you say, “they don’t fit into the culture,” someone might call you on it. What will your answer be?

_____________________________

Marlin is a Globetrotting Speaker, Founder of Sisters Code, and thought leader on bridging the racial and gender gap in technology.  Marlin serves as speaker for Microsoft’s global DigiGirlz Program and has been invited to present at SXSW, Techonomy, Meeting of the Minds, and more.  Marlin also serves as a media contributor on various outlets.  Marlin’s Book and Music Single empowers girls to love and believe in themselves.

Five tips for women who want to learn how to code – Bridging the gender and diversity gap in technology

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20-years ago I literally stumbled into the field of of technology, and my life was transformed.  After college I was an aspiring mortician at a local funeral home.  My day consisted of learning to embalm, consoling grieving families, and even singing and praying at the funerals.  Hey, I was every woman!

Unfortunately coding and technology are often presented in a very complex way, and it’s really not that deep.  A career in technology is accessible, you don’t need a thousand degrees, you don’t have to live in a certain area and you don’t have to look a certain way. As I work on bridging the gender and racial gap in technology, I speak with many women who feel they don’t have access to tech jobs or they lack the confidence to try.  I always say there is power in the first step, so below you will find five fun and easy tips (things you can do today) to move you closer to your technology goals:

1.  Try an introductory class.  No, not a class that costs thousands of dollars.  Before you make that type of investment, I would encourage you to try it out first.  After Sisters Code’s Weekend Website Warrior Classes, we have many women who experience coding “ah-ha” moments and go on to re-career into the field of technology or become tech entrepreneurs.  There are also some women who realize they hate coding, and I also consider that a success as they can now truly find their true life purpose.  Bottom-line:  Find a cost effective local introductory class or try an online option like codeacademy.com.

2.  Speak with other women who are in the field.   When I started my career in technology, it was great to see other women who looked like me in the field.  If you don’t know someone currently working in the tech field, don’t let that stop you.  This is where you get creative.  A few options:  Find a local women technology group, Google or Bing a woman you admire in tech and simply reach out (what’s the worst thing that could happen?)

3.  No apologies allowed.  No, you don’t know how to code.  No, you aren’t even sure what coding is.   Trust me, when I started my career in technology the only thing I knew about coding was how to spell the word.  If you are curious about entering the field of technology, don’t apologize to anyone for what you don’t know.  This is the time where you walk in with your head up high, and ask for what you want.  Focus on what you want to learn and take the necessary steps to get you there.

4.  Show up.  “Coding” is the new cool thing and the new buzz word, which means there are quite a few opportunities to  pick up this new skill.  However, I would be a millionaire if I had a dollar for every woman who has told me that there aren’t opportunities to learn and/or network.  The table has been set on a national level, now it’s time for you to show up and take your seat at the table.   Show up for classes, conferences, networking events and job fairs.  As the “excuse annihilator,” I can’t think of any excuse for you to stay away.

5.   Tap into your inner Swagger.  My teenage daughter would cringe at my use of that word, but I like it.  My definition of swagger is your confidence, the way you walk into the room, understanding that you deserve the best, etc.   Before you can learn to code or accomplish any other goal for that matter, you must first believe you can.  The underlying belief that you can do this, that you can accomplish this, that you can re-career into the field of technology is important.  It’s the first step…..

_________________________

Marlin is a Globetrotting Speaker, Founder of Sisters Code, and thought leader on bridging the racial and gender gap in technology.  Marlin serves as speaker for Microsoft’s global DigiGirlz Program and has been invited to present at SXSW, Techonomy, Meeting of the Minds, and more.  Marlin also serves as a media contributor on WDIV’s Live in the D.  Marlin’s Book and Music Single empowers girls to love and believe in themselves.

 

 

 

Gender Diversity in Technology: Why “Awakening the Mature Geek” and targeting women to re-career into the field of technology is essential

Sister Coder "Aha Moment." The moment the code you wrote actually works!

Sister Coder “Aha Moment.” The moment the code you wrote actually works!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The lack of females in the technology industry is the new “hot topic,” but it’s an old issue. As an African American Female in technology, I appreciate the discussion around this issue, however it’s going to take much more than fancy charts, statistics, or one off speeches from the token women in a technology  company to positively shift the technology gender and racial  diversity gap.

Bridging the technology gender gap is definitely possible, however it’s the “action” not the words that will get us there.  The key to bridging that gap is to stop ignoring grown women with the aptitude to code and empower them to re-career into the field of technology.

I am living proof that by “Awakening the Mature Geek,” we can make a major impact on gender gap in the field of technology.  At the age of 25, I was an aspiring mortician until a corporation hired me as a full-time paid employee and  afforded me the opportunity to learn to code in seven different languages in a 13-week program.  I emerged as a Mainframe (yes I’m dating myself) and the rest is history.  Technology literally transformed my life, the life of my family, and positively impacted my community.

The picture in this blog shows one of  Detroit’s based Sisters Code Participants experiencing a “coding ah-ha” moment.  I remember my light bulb moment like it was yesterday.  I wrote code in JCL and COBOL and fell in love with the possibility of learning more.  After learning DB2, CICS, IMS…I felt as if I could change the world.  Bottom-line:  I was enticed to try something different and I was exposed to a new career.

We are missing the mark:  There are lots of programs centered on motivating girls to consider S.T.E.M. field, coding classes not tied to workforce development, the lame excuse of “fitting into the culture,” and I totally disagree with Rev. Jesse Jackson that this is a Civil Rights Issue.  Unfortunately we are missing an entire population of women who have already entered the workforce, can start work tomorrow, bring a different level of expertise, work ethic, and overall a different flavor to the office.

Recently 10 companies released their diversity stats and although the numbers are staggering, I’m confident we can bridge the technology gender gap.  I’ve provided numbers based on overall female employees, female employees in tech jobs, and % of African Americans employed at the company.

  1. Google: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  2. Apple: Females makeup 30% of the workforce is women, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  3. Facebook: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  4. Twitter: Females makeup 20% of the workforce , however 10% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  5. Yahoo: Females makeup 37% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  6. LinkedIn: Females makeup 39% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  7. Pandora: Females makeup 49.2% of the workforce, however 18% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  8. Ebay: Females makeup 42% of the workforce, however 24% hold tech jobs.  7% of employees are African American.
  9. Pinterest: Females makeup 66% of the workforce, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  10. HP:  Females makeup 32.5% of the workforce. 6.06% are African American.

As a thought leader on empowering women to re-career into the field of technology, I’m willing to do my part.  If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

he lack of females in the technology industry is the new “hot topic,” but it’s an old issue. As an African American Female in technology, I appreciate the discussion around this issue, however it’s going to take much more than fancy charts, statistics, or one off speeches from the token women in a technology  company to positively shift the technology gender and racial  diversity gap.

Bridging the technology gender gap is definitely possible, however it’s the “action” not the words that will get us there.  The key to bridging that gap is to stop ignoring grown women with the aptitude to code and empower them to re-career into the field of technology.

I am living proof that by “Awakening the Mature Geek,” we can make a major impact on gender gap in the field of technology.  At the age of 25, I was an aspiring mortician until a corporation hired me as a full-time paid employee and  afforded me the opportunity to learn to code in seven different languages in a 13-week program.  I emerged as a Mainframe (yes I’m dating myself) and the rest is history.  Technology literally transformed my life, the life of my family, and positively impacted my community.

The picture in this blog shows one of  Detroit’s based Sisters Code Participants experiencing a “coding ah-ha” moment.  I remember my light bulb moment like it was yesterday.  I wrote code in JCL and COBOL and fell in love with the possibility of learning more.  After learning DB2, CICS, IMS…I felt as if I could change the world.  Bottom-line:  I was enticed to try something different and I was exposed to a new career.

We are missing the mark:  There are lots of programs centered on motivating girls to consider S.T.E.M. field, coding classes not tied to workforce development, the lame excuse of “fitting into the culture,” and I totally disagree with Rev. Jesse Jackson that this is a Civil Rights Issue.  Unfortunately we are missing an entire population of women who have already entered the workforce, can start work tomorrow, bring a different level of expertise, work ethic, and overall a different flavor to the office.

Recently 10 companies released their diversity stats and although the numbers are staggering, I’m confident we can bridge the technology gender gap.  I’ve provided numbers based on overall female employees, female employees in tech jobs, and % of African Americans employed at the company.

  1. Google: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  2. Apple: Females makeup 30% of the workforce is women, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  3. Facebook: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  4. Twitter: Females makeup 20% of the workforce , however 10% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  5. Yahoo: Females makeup 37% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  6. LinkedIn: Females makeup 39% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  7. Pandora: Females makeup 49.2% of the workforce, however 18% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  8. Ebay: Females makeup 42% of the workforce, however 24% hold tech jobs.  7% of employees are African American.
  9. Pinterest: Females makeup 66% of the workforce, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  10. HP:  Females makeup 32.5% of the workforce. 6.06% are African American.

As a thought leader on empowering women to re-career into the field of technology, I’m willing to do my part.  If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

- See more at: http://www.marlinpage.com/2014/gender-diversity-in-technology-why-awakening-the-mature-geek-and-targeting-older-women-to-re-career-into-the-field-of-tech-is-essential/#sthash.0hcrB0hQ.dpuf

he lack of females in the technology industry is the new “hot topic,” but it’s an old issue. As an African American Female in technology, I appreciate the discussion around this issue, however it’s going to take much more than fancy charts, statistics, or one off speeches from the token women in a technology  company to positively shift the technology gender and racial  diversity gap.

Bridging the technology gender gap is definitely possible, however it’s the “action” not the words that will get us there.  The key to bridging that gap is to stop ignoring grown women with the aptitude to code and empower them to re-career into the field of technology.

I am living proof that by “Awakening the Mature Geek,” we can make a major impact on gender gap in the field of technology.  At the age of 25, I was an aspiring mortician until a corporation hired me as a full-time paid employee and  afforded me the opportunity to learn to code in seven different languages in a 13-week program.  I emerged as a Mainframe (yes I’m dating myself) and the rest is history.  Technology literally transformed my life, the life of my family, and positively impacted my community.

The picture in this blog shows one of  Detroit’s based Sisters Code Participants experiencing a “coding ah-ha” moment.  I remember my light bulb moment like it was yesterday.  I wrote code in JCL and COBOL and fell in love with the possibility of learning more.  After learning DB2, CICS, IMS…I felt as if I could change the world.  Bottom-line:  I was enticed to try something different and I was exposed to a new career.

We are missing the mark:  There are lots of programs centered on motivating girls to consider S.T.E.M. field, coding classes not tied to workforce development, the lame excuse of “fitting into the culture,” and I totally disagree with Rev. Jesse Jackson that this is a Civil Rights Issue.  Unfortunately we are missing an entire population of women who have already entered the workforce, can start work tomorrow, bring a different level of expertise, work ethic, and overall a different flavor to the office.

Recently 10 companies released their diversity stats and although the numbers are staggering, I’m confident we can bridge the technology gender gap.  I’ve provided numbers based on overall female employees, female employees in tech jobs, and % of African Americans employed at the company.

  1. Google: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  2. Apple: Females makeup 30% of the workforce is women, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  3. Facebook: Females makeup 30% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  4. Twitter: Females makeup 20% of the workforce , however 10% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  5. Yahoo: Females makeup 37% of the workforce.  2% of employees are African American.
  6. LinkedIn: Females makeup 39% of the workforce.  1% of employees are African American.
  7. Pandora: Females makeup 49.2% of the workforce, however 18% hold tech jobs. 3% of employees are African American.
  8. Ebay: Females makeup 42% of the workforce, however 24% hold tech jobs.  7% of employees are African American.
  9. Pinterest: Females makeup 66% of the workforce, however 20% hold tech jobs. 7% of employees are African American.
  10. HP:  Females makeup 32.5% of the workforce. 6.06% are African American.

As a thought leader on empowering women to re-career into the field of technology, I’m willing to do my part.  If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

- See more at: http://www.marlinpage.com/2014/gender-diversity-in-technology-why-awakening-the-mature-geek-and-targeting-older-women-to-re-career-into-the-field-of-tech-is-essential/#sthash.0hcrB0hQ.dpuf

Lady Paragons Interview – My journey in technology and how we empower women to re-career into the field of technology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I had an amazing conversation with Sarah Worsham of Lady Paragons during the Women in STEM Podcast.  We talked about my journey from mortuary science to techie, the importance of awakening the mature geek and empowering women to re-career into technology, the Sisters Code difference, bridging the technology gender gap, the importance of walking in the room and “owning it,” and so much more.

Lady Paragons believe that women and girls can and do excel in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). They are building a community to tell the stories of women in STEM, showcase Women’s STEM organizations, and provide a platform where ladies can help ladies succeed in STEM careers. Click here for more information on Lady Paragons.

Below you will find the link to the podcast.  Check it out…would love your comments.!

http://bit.ly/1q51CVP

Rev. Jesse Jackson says that Tech Diversity is the Next Civil Rights Steps…As an African American Woman, I Disagree.

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Earlier this week it was reported that Rev. Jesse Jackson stated, “Tech Diversity is the next civil rights step.” As an African American Woman with 20+ years in the field of technology, I respectfully DISAGREE with Rev. Jackson’s opinion. As a matter of fact, I believe this type of rhetoric serves as a smokescreen and is not conducive to bridging the racial and gender technology gap. It simply takes our eyes off the prize.

Rev. Jackson’s lobbying tech companies asking them to disclose their hiring data is to be commended. However, now that the numbers have been exposed, this is an opportune time to shift the conversation.

This issue is about an empowerment movement in our African American community. A movement involving empowering us to proactively engage in the field of technology. A movement to transform technology consumers into coders.

There are STEM programs for young people in every state. Coding and Technology Classes for adults are plentiful (although some are one hit wonders with no employment opportunities tied to them…but that’s another conversation). The aforementioned being true now raises questions and shifts the conversation to how we can collectively: 1) improve community awareness and encourage active participation in technology training programs and career opportunities, 2) empower minorities to believe they can succeed in this field, 3) engage job opportunities in the right role given many aspects of technology jobs, not merely, “coding”, 4) engage committed technology employers in a conversation, which leads to hiring entry level non-traditionally, educated technology professionals.

Shifting the conversation must also involve a discussion around a full cycle program of helping successful non-tech workers re-career into the field of technology. We are missing an entire population of adults who are unemployed, underemployed or simply looking for a change. Through our Detroit based organization, Sisters Code, we call it “Awakening the Mature Geek,” and I’m living proof that it will work.

After college, I was an aspiring mortician and middle school teacher.  At the age of 25, I participated in a corporate training program where I learned to code in seven different languages in 13-weeks. My life was instantly transformed as I emerged as a mainframe programmer. I went on to become a global technology corporate executive, Deputy CIO, and Technology CEO. If I did not have my personal technology “awakening”, my life would not be what it is today.

Although my perspective is different from Rev. Jackson’s, it does not mean I don’t recognize the need for deeper engagement across our eco-system. There must be opportunity awareness in the community, identification of individuals who are interested in exploring careers in technology, training and workforce development programs with a direct link to jobs, and corporations who are committed to hiring non-traditionally educated employees.

Speaking from the experience of often being the only woman and person of color at many technology tables, the workforce technology diversity numbers aren’t shocking but I’m 100% sure we can do better.

If we are really serious about bridging the racial and gender technology gap, there must be accountability and engagement among all concerned parties.

Count me in.

Sisters Code Participants Receive Free Membership to Michigan Council of Women in Technology

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Sending a special thank you to the Michigan Council of Women in Technology for gifting two Sister Code participants with free memberships to their illustrious organization.  MCWT is a progressive organization that inspires and supports women as they enter, advance, and contribute to Michigan’s technology community.

Last week in partnership with Microsoft Corporation we celebrated 50 “New Geeks.”  Since Sisters Code was founded in September 2013, we have trained 50 women to code in Java Script while building interactive websites.  Some of the women have gone on to develop websites, start their own businesses, and enrolled in college courses.  During the celebration, MCWT Executive Director, Janette Phillips motivated the women to believe in themselves and to consider re-careering into technology.

Since launching our 2020 BYTE 2020 Campaign last week,  we have received hundreds of inquiries.  It is evident that women are interested in re-careering into the field of technology, however it is very important that they see people that “look like them,” who are already doing it.

Kudos to MCWT for affording Sisters Code’s participants with an opportunity to network with some of the greatest women in technology.

For more information on MCWT please visit:  www.mcwt.org